Robert Frank is one of my favorite photographers…  Sweet shoes.

life:

For all you photo nerds out there…
Robert Frank’s Red-and-Yellow Brogues, Circa 1974-1975
The groundbreaking Swiss-born photographer Robert Frank spent two years crisscrossing the United States, photographing all strata of society. In all, he shot some 28,000 frames. The result was his 1958 magnum opus called The Americans, a searing look at the contradictions of life in the U.S. Frank accidentally left these shoes at the Visual Studies Workshop in Rochester, N.Y., while working with film students in the mid-1970s.
(see more — Shoes of the Very Famous)



Robert Frank is one of my favorite photographers…  Sweet shoes.

life:

For all you photo nerds out there

Robert Frank’s Red-and-Yellow Brogues, Circa 1974-1975

The groundbreaking Swiss-born photographer Robert Frank spent two years crisscrossing the United States, photographing all strata of society. In all, he shot some 28,000 frames. The result was his 1958 magnum opus called The Americans, a searing look at the contradictions of life in the U.S. Frank accidentally left these shoes at the Visual Studies Workshop in Rochester, N.Y., while working with film students in the mid-1970s.

(see more Shoes of the Very Famous)


18 October 2011
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York
(photo by justin paul ware.)



18 October 2011

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York

(photo by justin paul ware.)


from The Atlantic:
“China’s Abandoned Wonderland”
“In Chenzhuang Village, China, about 20 miles northwest of central Beijing, the ruins of a partially built amusement park called Wonderland sit near a highway, surrounded by houses and fields of corn. Construction work at the park, which developers had promised would be “the largest amusement park in Asia,” stopped around 1998 after disagreements with the local government and farmers over property prices. Developers briefly tried to restart construction in 2008, but without success. The abandoned structures are now a draw for local children and a few photographers, who encounter signs telling them to proceed at their own risk. Reuters photographer David Gray visited the site on a chilly morning earlier this month and returned with these haunting images of a would-be Wonderland.”



from The Atlantic:

China’s Abandoned Wonderland

In Chenzhuang Village, China, about 20 miles northwest of central Beijing, the ruins of a partially built amusement park called Wonderland sit near a highway, surrounded by houses and fields of corn. Construction work at the park, which developers had promised would be “the largest amusement park in Asia,” stopped around 1998 after disagreements with the local government and farmers over property prices. Developers briefly tried to restart construction in 2008, but without success. The abandoned structures are now a draw for local children and a few photographers, who encounter signs telling them to proceed at their own risk. Reuters photographer David Gray visited the site on a chilly morning earlier this month and returned with these haunting images of a would-be Wonderland.”